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of the republican party,. with matt, later we will talk with dan glickman on whether congress can reach compromise during the lame-duck session. -- we will speak about the future of the republican party with matt lesis. we will be right back. [video clip] >> you listen to mayor bloomberg, said the damage was an president and maybe the worst storm the city ever faced and the tidal surge was 14. governor chris christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable and we had fires and hurricane force winds, massive flooding, deepersnow. when you looked at that and but flooding to the health care systems and the shutdown of the stock exchanges, you start to get a sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm and yet the networks performed. i have read dozens of stories over the last couple weeks on how for many consumers their only tie to any information or people was through their smartphone, linking social media and other smartphone. while there was an impact on some websites, the networks performed really pretty well. >> my assessment is some networks did well, some networks did less well, bu
'll ask dan marino about today's nfl match-ups and how football got to be so important on thanksgiving day. but first, here's a look at today's eye opener at 8:00. >> it's like being on a different planet today in gaza city. it's a whole world away from what this place was like 24 hours ago. >> the cease-fire between israel and hamas held overnight and continues to hold at this hour. >> egypt has definitely emerged as the winner in all this. >> did the u.s. have to make any deals or concessions? >> peace comes with a price. egypt is going to get around $450 million in emergency cash. >> jesse jackson jr.'s career in congress is over. the illinois congressman resigned wednesday after nearly six months on medical leave. >> volunteers here in this kitchen behind me have been busy preparing thanksgiving meals for residents of a new jersey town devastated by hurricane sandy. >> it just lets you know everything we take for granted we shouldn't take for granted. >> there's a new app in time for thanksgiving dinner called smash your food. teaching you about your healthy eating.
on the president or miss rice? >> the president is ultimately responsible. >> cnn's dan lothian first reported this morning's meeting with rice and mccain. he joins us now from the white house. dan, rice has not been nominated, not yet. how important are these meetings today? >> it's very important. republicans have been very concerned about the narrative that she put out there shortly after those benghazi attacks. they have a lot of questions and don't feel that this white house and this administration has been very transparent in the process. they have been very critical of her. as you heard the senator pount out there, it was ambassador rice who asked for these meetings. she will be accompanied by acting cia director mike morel. what's interesting is that we've seen some of the harshest criticism has been sort of toned down as we heard there from senator john mccain. from threatening to block her nomination as possible secretary of state to a willingness to hear her out, senator john mccain seems to be dialing back his public opposition to ambassador susan rice. >> i think she deserves the
paper in san diego talking about dan mckennon and it says navy pilot, radio and airline executive, appointed to two federal boards and son of san diego congressman. those are a lot of things but dan was so much more than all of those even put together. first, his father was a democrat congressman from san diego here in the 1950's. probably stood at this table like i am speaking now. dan was a page when we still had pages in the house in the 1950's during the truman administration as well. he had a great respect and love for this country and he had a great respect and love for this body and the institution. he has some great claims to fame. one of those is this -- as a young man, dan served in the navy as a helicopter pilot and he's credited with 62 saves on land or sea. that's more saves during peace time than any other navy pilot in history. he loved the navy and loved flying and that led him to other things in life. he was a great pilot. he was inspired to fly from some words taken from the movie "the bridge over toko" and i will summarize what made him want to be a helicopter p
assets to another. [laughter] amid the dangerous period fannie appointed a new ceo. dan mud. son of roger mud, the tv newscaster. he was an ex-marine, decorated for a dangerous mission in lebanon. now he was stepping in to another mine field. mud saw his job as cleaning up the accounting mess. making nice with the critics of fannie may, meeting the goals for affordable housing loans which had been increased further under president bush and competing with wall street in the mortgage market. wall street was crazy about mortgage especially the riskier kinds. they were profitable. wall street was taking away more and more of the business from fannie and freddie. mud and the colleagues were worried that fannie night become irrelevant. so what should they do? should they go and buy the same kind of crazy mortgages that wall street was buying? or should they step back from the market and wait for a new outbreak of insanity? mud and the colleagues knew that the risks were growing in the housing market. but they underestimated how much worst things could get and they were red blooded american busi
of affairs in illinois. it's not pretty. >> dan hynes is the comptroller of the state of illinois, its paymaster. he currently has about $5 billion in outstanding bills in his office and not enough money in the state's coffers to pay them. he says they're six months behind. how many people do you have clamoring for money? >> it's fair to say that there are, you know, tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of people waiting to be paid by the state. >> so how are these people getting by if they're not getting paid by the state? >> well, that's the tragedy. people borrow money. they borrow in order to, you know, get by until the state pays them. >> they're subsidizing the state. they're giving the state a float. >> exactly. >> and who do you owe that money to? >> pretty much anybody who has any interaction with state government, we owe money to. >> that would include everyone from the university of illinois, which is owed $400 million, to small businessmen like mayur shah, who owns a pharmacy in chicago and has been waiting months for $200,000 in medicaid payments. then there are
and people said, 'boy, what happened to all that money?'" groupon alum dan knispel also was forced to sit on the sidelines as the value of his shares plummeted "i'd say it was rough, from time to time, especially as the number got smaller and smaller." like many early groupon employees, both bowman and knispel took a little less in upfront salary to get equity options in the firm, a decision which looked good when google nearly bought groupon for a reported $6 billion figure in 2010. "i mean, you're just thinking big. you're not thinking money after taxes or anything realistic, you're just thinking, 'i'm going to get a windfall of cash and this is going to be amazing!'" "it's not a new story for tech employees to have their options underwater. it's just kinda the breaks." in his book "groupon's biggest deal ever," frank sennett details how founding partners like eric levkofsky cashed out some of their shares before groupon's ipo, pocketing hundreds of millions of dollars in the process. "they're the early-stage founders, they're the ones driving the bus. and there are all sorts of lessons
a seventh day adventist? cnn.com religion editor dan gilgoff joins me. you see the clip and you see him sitting there next to a man, there is this other man on his right-hand side, this is christopher hudson. you've talked to him. who is he? >> right. i just hung up with christopher about an hour or two ago. he describes himself as an evangelist for the seventh day adventist, based in alabama. just last week he was put in touch with angus, the actor, flew out to california and spent some time filming him for the testimonials that have caught all this attention online. this guy, christopher, says that ever since the videos went up a couple of days ago, his phone has been ringing off the hook and so he feels like mission accomplished. the message about the church is getting out there. he also tells me that he just talked to angus yesterday, he's doing well and he's happy with how everything is going in terms of reaction so far. >> okay. so take me back, you mentioned the message of the church or this group, seventh day adventist. who are they and what is their message? >> they believe in
. dan simon tells us why sma smartphones and social media aren't just for kids. >> reporter: barbara is constantly using her phone. >> i keep it at my bedside. >> reporter: she represents a growing segment of smartphone add adapters. baby boomers but not explosive growth that you see with younger users. fewer than four in ten boomers have smartphones. that's only expected to inch up in the next few years. when it comes to social networks, silicone valley may need a different strategy. while barbara logs onto facebook and twitter, she does not post photos or reveal much information. >> i don't share a ton of stuff about my personal life because it doesn't occur to me to do that. >> reporter: it's not that boomers are shunning social networks, it's yet they have fully to embrace it. experts like esra palmer. >> sharing photos or check ng at restaurants, they're not going to be that excited about doing that. >> reporter: emarketer did a study on boomers. it found that 57% of them had viewed social networks. not bad. those that do are unlikely to use regularly. also privacy is a much big
to try to make sure things are done his way. our white house correspondent dan lothian is joining us now with new information. what are you learning, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, while senior members of the administration including secretary geithner, chief of staff jack lou also top advisor meeting with -- the president himself trying to sell his vision to the public, but some say it's not a winning strategy. it doesn't take a gps to find the way to the fiscal cliff. much more difficult, finding the off ramp. at the president's first meeting with congressional leaders more than a week ago, there was a sense of optimism. >> my hope is is that this is going to be the beginning of a fruitful process. >> reporter: there was a follow-up phone call with house speaker john boehner, but a much different approach this week. the president's calendar is packed with sales pitches to the public, which he hopes will strengthen his hand in negotiations with republicans. on monday a white house report on the impact of middle class tax cuts on the economy. tuesday, a meeting with small business owners.
in santa ago go. hurling fought back with tear gas and water dan nones. they have been rallying for more than a year against tuition costs which are among the highest in the world. united kingdom. heavy winds and rains battering the south of england for a second straight day. the weather triggered flash flooding across much of the region. authorities reportedly set up temporary dams to contain water from a canal that breached its banks. first alert forecasters predict more strong winds and rain this weekend. france, a rare letter written by the emperor knap napoleon. the 1812 letter apparently used code to order a military commander to blow up the russian kremlin. one expert says he expects the letter to fetch nearly $20,000. bosnia. catholic priests and muslim imams face off in a charity soccer match. religious leaders for both groups came up with the idea after local authorities said the city needed money for a new kindergarten. thousands of fans bought tickets to the match and cheered whoever scored. the priests won a to 3. and that's a wrap on this fox trip around the world in 80 sec
a few words about our california former attorney general, congressman dan lungren. congressman lungren was first elected to congress in 1978, where his legal background was instrumental in his leadership on judiciary, criminal juiceties and immigration issues. he was called back to state service in 1989 and successfully ran for attorney general where he served from 1991 to 1999. as attorney general, congressman lungren helped author and later defended in court california's landmark three strikes and you're out law. during his tenure and due to his tough on crime policies. crime plunged 30% to historic lows in california. after a few years in the private sector -- sector and the aftermath of september 11, 2001, congressman lungren decided to return to congress and was re-elected in 2004. since his return, congressman lungren has used his time and talents as a member of the judiciary and homeland security committee. throughout his career, congressman lungren has supported, and been supported by his wonderful wife bobbie and their family. thank you, congressman lunfwren for your contribut
talked about this. as has dan hartman. a hacking group associated with anonymous claims to have penetrated karl rove's network and plant and tested a targeted password protected fire wall called the great oz which they hoped would protect the great citizens. they tried unsuccessfully in so 5 times to -- in 105 times to change tallies on election night. which explains his refusal to accept the results. if karl rove doesn't resign, the evidence goes to a certain painfully bored nemesis hanging out in an embassy in london. [ ♪ dramatic ♪ ] >> but more importantly, they're going to give the evidence to the fbi. >> stephanie: the frog marching of karl rove might happen. >> in 2004, at 11:13, all of the servers crashed and it bounced to another server in tennessee. the votes came back suddenly. kerry was leading in a landslide. >> stephanie: i'm not a constitutional scholar which i know shocks both of you. can john kerry be retroactively named president after president obama? >> no. >> stephanie: why not? >>
, there is also a dan malloy who passed major legislation earlier this year in connecticut. where there is a john king, there is also a kevin hougher in. now the lines have blurred even more. i think kevin is a democrat working for a republican governor. this is even truer in the electorate. you saw washington state, which i mentioned, georgia, approve charter schools for the first time. the voters in indiana out ofed tony bennett, voters in indianapolis approved reform minded candidates for school board who were supported by democrats for education reform. i know indianapolis is not synonymous with indiana. i grew up in chicago. but it strikes me as a complication in the traditional coalition. maybe it's urban versus suburban. it might also have to do with organization and the fact that the public may support part of the reform agenda. not other parts. some candidates but not others. so reforms have to get down deep at the ground level and fight the local battle and create broad, center based coalitions to win these fights. fourth, my class point, is that implementation is key. we've got to get
in the air. people were still uncomfortable about walter having stepped down and dan rather stepping in. i think there was competition. there was jealousy. there was envy. i think on walter's part there was some regret. he was such a young man to leave that job. he was such an icon even in his own day. what made me excited was that, through all of that, the culture of storytelling and reporting did not change at all. in some ways, it gradually did start to change at cbs. but, for me, i could not believe it. i felt like these people were so professional. i was scared to death. that is a good thing, i think, that you feel like you have a lot of experience and you have done a lot of reporting and producing and you understand television news, but you are surrounded people who are really good and challenge you. i love that. i felt like i was able to learn some of the more traditional values you will at the school that started in our building. i will talk about those a little bit as we go. i also got very fortunate because i ended up overseas within about three years. based in london. i recommen
the future of the republican party and dan about the potential for a better part is an agreement on the fiscal cliff. we will also look at the federal housing administration and $16 billion shortfall. that is all at 7:00 eastern tomorrow morning. we will see you then. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> next on c-span, "newsmakers" with mary kay henry
weeks. the state of florida is on the low end. host: this was updated november 2of 2012. welcome, dan. you're on the air. caller: good morning. this is another extension of the entitlement society. we would not have to have this continued discussion about how long people have been on unemployment. it is more of the entitlement society. i believe that romney cost himself the election by making comment.n i think 30% of the country thinks they should be able to sit around and not do anything. what has the president done? passing nationalized health care. everybody who has a brain in their head understands nationalize health care has not worked in europe and canada and it will not work here in the united states. guest: i take issue with a couple of points. this is an entitlement society. i am glad my mother was able to get social security and medicare. she earned it and she got it. i'm sure the seniors feel they paid into the system and the earned it. payments are made into the system based on work that individuals do. when they lose their jobs, they get this insurance. they get what they
. be there was ted bush there was a dan ma low. where there's a john king there's a -- [inaudible] now the lines are blurring even more. i think kevin is a democrat working for a republican governor. this is even truer in the elector rate. you saw washington state, and georgia approve charter schools for the first time. the voters in indiana -- voters in indianapolis approved reform minded candidates for school board that were supported by democrats for education. i know, in indianapolis it's enormous with indiana i did group in chicago i'm familiar with the state. it strikes me as a comp indication i think it might have to do with organization and the fact that the public support part reform agenda on other part some candidates but not others. so reformers have to get down deep at the ground level and fight the local battle and create rawed center base coalitions to win these fights. fourth, my last point is that imflexation is key. we have to get the big reforms right if the public is to accept future. the common core standard are [inaudible] in content and teaching strategy. let's focus on en
, but it is actually the demand side that is broken, not the supply side. dan mintz any move the government makes to take money out of the pockets -- that means that any move the government makes to take money out of the pockets of the middle income people will hurt the economy. one third of the economy and economic problems are caused by lack of unemployment. so, if more money were spent on a jobs program, especially building roads, things that increase productivity, we would be much better off than giving tax breaks to the rich. so, i think the argument is skewed because we have a supply- demand economy, and it is the demand but is broken here. host: zachary goldfarb. guest: the most immediate problem is a continued lack of demand and economic activity which is leftover from the financial crisis and the recession, and there is a debate in washington over whether you should address that now through additional spending measures. there are not many proposals to do that, but people like larry summers have suggested reviewing the payroll tax cut. in the context in the debate over the bush tax cuts,
running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you will of course are familiar with. he is the chief of neurosurgery and chairman of the department of surgery and drifter of services of
legal in the country. this is about 50 minutes. >> dan has written a wonderful book but it you have not seen the exhibit downstairs, i think he will be impressed with what has been put together in celebration of the prohibition and anti prohibition movement. it is exciting to talk about prohibition for the reason that the election has put the question of anti prohibition before us all over again. in addition to the ballot initiative in colorado and washington, we have medical use approved in massachusetts and two new announcements in rhode island and maine that legislations will take up the question of decriminilization of marijuana for recreational use. the question of the day is one i will offer today which is what lessons can we draw from prohibition for today's issue? >> the first one we know that prohibition was a terrible failure. despite the best of intentions, there were good reasons for prohibition. the efforts did not succeed. the comparison i make is to prostitution. every society since the dawn has tried to outlaw prostitution and no one has succeeded. it is part of a wo
this question -- why does dan lungren want me to die? as did a 19-year-old. who indicated that he had suffered some paralysis from an accident. as did a 40-year-old woman, approximately, for some disease she had. stunning. stunning. only thing i could see on the other side of the philosophical divide would be someone who is an army vet, having been paralyzed, sitting in a wheelchair, looking in -- at the camera, saying about a member who had voted against a defense bill, why do you want me to die? why do you want me to be in a wheelchair? in either case the civility is out the window. the ability to talk about an issue that is underlying it is last -- is lost. in the example i gave, the question would be was an appropriate level of funding for defense, were there certain problems with the defense bill? not do you want this veteran to die? in the case that i cited in which i was the subject of that ad, the issue was embreeon exstem cell research. embryonic stem cell research. not the question of what is the ethical thing to do in a very difficult circumstance. former president george w. bush ha
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22